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  • Tom Dixon, prototype S chair, 1987-88, Tom dixon
  • Tom Dixon, prototype S chair, 1987-88, Tom dixon
  • Tom Dixon, prototype S chair, 1987-88, Tom dixon
  • Tom Dixon, prototype S chair, 1987-88, Tom dixon
  • Tom Dixon, prototype S chair, 1987-88, Tom dixon
  • Tom Dixon, prototype S chair, 1987-88, Tom dixon
  • Tom Dixon, prototype S chair, 1987-88, Tom dixon
  • Tom Dixon, prototype S chair, 1987-88, Tom dixon
  • Tom Dixon, prototype S chair, 1987-88, Tom dixon
  • Tom Dixon, prototype S chair, 1987-88, Tom dixon
  • Tom Dixon, prototype S chair, 1987-88, Tom dixon

Tom Dixon, prototype S chair, 1987-88

S chair prototype by Tom Dixon

Pair available, priced singularly.

The S chair offered is an early developmental prototype. It was acquired in the late 1980s as part of a group of designs by Tom Dixon directly from the designer in exchange for a painting.

Significantly, the hand-formed and welded steel frame differs from models seen in V&A and MoMA collections, with a simplified single ring base. It closely resembles the example in the Vitra Design Museum collection. The straw is from Norfolk and likely to have been handwoven by Ingrid Chen

The S chair marked a significant point in Tom Dixon’s career when the design was licensed by Giulio Cappellini for international distribution.

The now-iconic profile pays reference to other single-piece cantilever chair designs from Gerrit Reitveld’s Zig Zag and Verner Panton’s designs in plywood and plastic.

Tom Dixon says of the design:
“I have often been asked what the inspiration was behind the S-Chair and, honestly, the only memory I have is of drawing a small doodle of a chicken […] and thinking that I could make a chair from it.”

“The secret of its success, I believe, was creating an unexpected and unconventional shape in an archetypical comforting material.”

It is thought that Dixon’s workshops may have produced around 60 S-chairs before manufacture was taken over by Cappellini. These early chairs were in a variety of materials including latex, wicker and tyre inner tubes. They also employed found materials and components for the base configuration, with Tom Dixon being a founding member of the ‘Creative Salvage’ movement.

It is perhaps the rustic nature of woven straw in combination with a modernist profile that is most successful.

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Vintage

This is a one off vintage item that is also on display in store. Therefore it can only be purchased once availability has been confirmed. If you wish to purchase please call 020 7288 1996 or enquire.

£2,500

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Description Dropdown

S chair prototype by Tom Dixon

Pair available, priced singularly.

The S chair offered is an early developmental prototype. It was acquired in the late 1980s as part of a group of designs by Tom Dixon directly from the designer in exchange for a painting.

Significantly, the hand-formed and welded steel frame differs from models seen in V&A and MoMA collections, with a simplified single ring base. It closely resembles the example in the Vitra Design Museum collection. The straw is from Norfolk and likely to have been handwoven by Ingrid Chen

The S chair marked a significant point in Tom Dixon’s career when the design was licensed by Giulio Cappellini for international distribution.

The now-iconic profile pays reference to other single-piece cantilever chair designs from Gerrit Reitveld’s Zig Zag and Verner Panton’s designs in plywood and plastic.

Tom Dixon says of the design:
“I have often been asked what the inspiration was behind the S-Chair and, honestly, the only memory I have is of drawing a small doodle of a chicken […] and thinking that I could make a chair from it.”

“The secret of its success, I believe, was creating an unexpected and unconventional shape in an archetypical comforting material.”

It is thought that Dixon’s workshops may have produced around 60 S-chairs before manufacture was taken over by Cappellini. These early chairs were in a variety of materials including latex, wicker and tyre inner tubes. They also employed found materials and components for the base configuration, with Tom Dixon being a founding member of the ‘Creative Salvage’ movement.

It is perhaps the rustic nature of woven straw in combination with a modernist profile that is most successful.

Dimensions Dropdown

45 x 50 x 50/99cmh

Materials Dropdown

Woven straw seat with steel frame

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